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Wanderlust (15 – Dir: David Wain – Stars: Paul Rudd, Jennifer Aniston, Justin Theroux)

Wanderlust is a delicious retrospective on the hippy era, marred only by too much nudity by hippies of a certain age.

Wanderlust is a delicious retrospective on the hippy era, marred only by too much nudity by hippies of a certain age.

Stressed and jobless in Manhattan, George and Linda are forced to accept an invitation from his awful brother in Atlanta. On route they stumble on Elysium, but is the distinctly American take on the paradise of Greek and Renaissance myth the real deal?

They like the locally trodden wine, the hallucinatory tea and the primal screaming, but the free love is a no-inhibitions choice too far.

Rudd is anxiety and determination personified, Aniston a Friend in a poncho, and Theroux excellent as the cultish hero/villain Seth.

8/10

One for the Money (12 – Dir: Julie Ann Robinson – Stars: Katherine Heigl, Jason O’Mara)

Bright, attractive and confident ... that’s Stephanie Plum (Heigl). Then her life falls apart as she’s laid off, gets divorced, and is forced to accept an offer of work in her sleazy cousin’s bail bond office, not filling forms but bringing vicious crooks to justice.

It’s a rapid learning curve, and gets tougher when her top target is old but never quite extinguished flame and ex-cop gone wrong Morelli (O’Mara).

Heigl is stylish as the narrating heroine, and it’s packed with hard-hitting action and one-liners, especially from her Jewish folks back home.

8/10

21 Jump Street (15- Dir: Lord/Miller – Stars: Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum)

Schmidt (Hill) and Jenko (Tatum) were victim and bully, respectively, at high school. Now they are uneasy cop partners who have to return to their alma mater to bust a drugs ring.

Despite looking like mature students, no one twigs as they infiltrate themselves into their studies, suddenly finding a passion for subjects, like maths, they failed earlier. Partying they are good at, and as they infiltrate like crazy they gradually find a new respect for each other.

Jump Street is a good idea (Hill was a co-writer), but the film gradually loses momentum, becoming preoccupied with the stereotypical shenanigans of the US school teen genre. Hill’s ‘dork’ is also old hat.

7/10