Brave mum’s going up in the world for charity

36 year old Emma Taylor, a teacher at Audley Infant School in Blackburn, is taking part in the challenge on the 28th October because her 8 year old son Jack has cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the UK's most common, life-threatening inherited diseases.
36 year old Emma Taylor, a teacher at Audley Infant School in Blackburn, is taking part in the challenge on the 28th October because her 8 year old son Jack has cystic fibrosis (CF), one of the UK's most common, life-threatening inherited diseases.

A courageous Chorley youngster is battling a life-threatening disease - and even taking part in medical trials to help doctors.

Brave Jack Taylor, eight, suffers from cystic fibrosis.

More than 9,000 people in the UK have the disease.

Each day he has to take around 40 tablets and also needs physiotherapy twice a day to keep his lungs clear.

Now his mum is quite literally stepping up her fund raising efforts next month to help her son and others like him.

Teacher Emma Taylor, 36, will ascend Europe’s tallest residential building step by step when she takes part in the Beetham Tower Run in Manchester.

Emma, of Poplar Drive, Coppull, who is doing challenge with Jack’s aunty Helen Turner, of Astley Village, said: “Jack kept fairly well as a young child, it was only when he started school we began to notice him suffering with tummy aches which led to his eventual diagnosis in February 2010.

“He’s doing well now and is even taking part in trials to help doctors learn how to treat infections in the lungs more effectively.

“We have been amazed by our friends and family who have really got into fundraising for the Cystic Fibrosis Trust, even asking for donations to the Trust instead of presents, so I thought I would do something as well and this event seemed a little bit different.

“Money I raise will help to fund research into new treatments and ensures people with CF like Jack get the right care and support.

“It’s going to be a hard slog but it’ll be worth it when I get to the 46th floor.”

Emma said the idea of the tower ascent was a little daunting, but that she would be ready for the challenge ahead on the day, adding: “The thought of it is a lot worse - it will be better when I get there.”

Cystic fibrosis is one of the UK’s most common, life-threatening inherited diseases.

It is caused by a defective gene that results in the internal organs, especially the lungs and digestive system, becoming clogged with thick sticky mucus resulting in chronic infections and inflammation in the lungs and difficulty absorbing food.

More than two million people in the UK carry the faulty gene that causes cystic fibrosis - around one in 25 of the population.

Founded in 1964, the Cystic Fibrosis Trust is a national charity in the United Kingdom which funds research into the disease and provides information and support for patients and families.

The Beetham Tower event challenges participants to run or walk up the UK’s tallest building outside London – by completing 798 steps to reach level 46 of the tower.

Completed in 2006, the tower is named after its developers, the Beetham Organisation.

The iconic, award-winning building is visible from 10 counties on a clear day and is the tallest residential building in Europe at 169 metres.

All proceeds from the event will be split equally between the Cystic Fibrosis Trust and Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital Charity.

The Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital Charity is actively supported by people from all over the country.

They include thousands of individuals, businesses and community organisations each making their own unique contribution to make life better for the hospital’s patients and their families.

Emma, a teacher at Audley Infant School, Blackburn, is taking part in the Betham Tower Run challenge on October 28.

You can sponsor her at http://uk.virginmoneygiving.com/team/jacksquest