Hero rushed to help heart attack victim at Chorley Interchange

Stagecoach inspector Trevor Stamford
Stagecoach inspector Trevor Stamford

An inspector went “above and beyond the call of duty” when he rushed to help a passenger who suffered a cardiac arrest on a bus.

Trevor Stamford was working in the Stagecoach office at Chorley Interchange when a driver asked for his help.

“Trevor went above and beyond the call of duty to do everything he could to use his first aid training to save the passenger’s life and he has set a great example to the team.”

Elisabeth Tasker, managing director of Stagecoach Merseyside and South Lancashire

A passenger, aged around 70 years old, had fallen ill on the 125 bus scheduled to leave Chorley for Preston at 9.35pm.

Trevor, 42, rushed to the bus to see what he could do to help. He checked the man’s pulse and breathing but found he was “completely unresponsive”.

“I did a quick assessment and could see he was in a bad way,” he said.

Trevor and a female passenger decided to carry out CPR. He looked after the man’s airway while the woman did chest compressions.

Trevor said: “We were just about to swap over and he took a breath.

“We had a couple of seconds to take stock and made sure that he was breathing and his heart was beating again and that was that.”

Father-of-two Trevor was “elated” when the man started breathing.

He said paramedics arrived quickly and told him the man had suffered a heart attack.

A spokesman for North West Ambulance Service said the man had a cardiac arrest and was taken to Chorley and South Ribble Hospital for treatment.

Trevor said he knew what to do because of his military background – he was in the Army for 12 years and served with the Royal Signals.

He had also done first aid courses with Stagecoach.

He said: “It goes without saying that I would do it again. In those sort of situations, I just switch into military mode.

“You never forget it, it’s always with you.”

Trevor has been a bus inspector for 10 years and said while he has previously helped passengers who have fainted, he had not come across anything as serious as this at the interchange before.

But he has used his skills to help other people.

“If I see any major accidents I will stop, because I know I can help and I have the training and know how to make a difference.”

He praised the female passenger who performed CPR with him and Stagecoach have given her a free annual bus pass to recognise her efforts.

Trevor, who lives in Horwich, does not know what happened to the man after he was taken to hospital, but he hopes he has recovered.

He said: “I hope that we both made a difference. I hope that he is okay. .”

Hospital chiefs said they were unable to givethe Guardian further information about the man was as he was not a patient.

Elisabeth Tasker, managing director of Stagecoach Merseyside and South Lancashire, praised Trevor’s efforts.

She said: “We are incredibly proud of how he responded to this incident.

“Trevor went above and beyond the call of duty to do everything he could to use his first aid training to save the passenger’s life and he has set a great example to the team.

“We hope that all our drivers and inspectors would do the same in similar circumstances.

“Our thoughts are with the passenger’s friends and family.”