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Unruly tenants in new year warning

CCHs tenancy enforcement team, Anna Court, Craig Bradshaw, Neil Kenyon and Debbie Parkinson

CCHs tenancy enforcement team, Anna Court, Craig Bradshaw, Neil Kenyon and Debbie Parkinson

 

Rented housing bosses in Chorley are preparing for a busy year ahead after revealing they handled more than 500 anti-social behaviour cases in the borough in 2013.

Chorley Community Housing’s tenancy enforcement team dealt with a whole range of complaints last year.

These included:

•Injunctions against six people who targeted a vulnerable tenant in Chorley town centre;

•An injunction against a man who was violent and threatening towards his former partner in Coppull and to local residents and their children;

•Recovery of a property in Buttermere Avenue where the tenant assaulted several neighbours.

Debbie Parkinson, tenancy enforcement manager, said: “There has always been anti-social behaviour and there probably always will be.

“The fact that we have been so busy as a team during 2013 is a sign that people are confident we can resolve a problem for them. They know that we can - and will - tackle problems that they have simply tried to put up with in the past or that might have forced them to move to another property.

“Decent law abiding tenants shouldn’t have to put up with excessive noise or any kind of intimidating or aggressive behaviour and we will take whatever action we have to in order to deal with a tenant who chooses not to be a good neighbour.”

Removing an unruly tenant can cost CCH more than £10,000. Debbie said though: “But the cost of doing nothing when you bear in mind the fact that the tenant causing the nuisance often isn’t paying their rent and can lead two or three other tenants to move away is actually greater.”

Her message to tenants for 2014 is: “If you’re someone who’s going to commit anti-social behaviour, then think again. You could lose your home and you could even end up with a prison sentence. At the very least, you should think about how much easier you could make life for your neighbours by turning that stereo down or not inviting your mates back for a late night after going down the pub. And if you’re someone who’s on the receiving end of anti-social behaviour, then don’t put up with it. Contact us and let us sort out the problem.”

 

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