New forensic tests in bid to solve murder

Det Supt. Mick Turner of the Lancashire Police (behind) during a news conference at Bilston St., Police station, Wolverhampton, with a reconstructed bust of a skeleton found in a lake adjacent to the M6 motorway. Detectives investigating the murder of a man whose decomposed remains were found in a pond were issuing a fresh appeal for information today, experts established that the victim may have lived in the West Midlands during the last decade of his life. Police say that chemical analysis of his bones has led to the breakthrough which links him to the region. 'A scientist from Manchester University has constructed a clay model of the man's head from the remains found near Charnock Richard Services on the M6, near Chorley, on July 26 last year. It is thought the victim died from "blunt force trauma" to his skull at some time between October 2000 and June 2001. Earlier investigations by experts from Glasgow University's Human Identification Unit found that the victim was likely to have been Asian, but they c

Det Supt. Mick Turner of the Lancashire Police (behind) during a news conference at Bilston St., Police station, Wolverhampton, with a reconstructed bust of a skeleton found in a lake adjacent to the M6 motorway. Detectives investigating the murder of a man whose decomposed remains were found in a pond were issuing a fresh appeal for information today, experts established that the victim may have lived in the West Midlands during the last decade of his life. Police say that chemical analysis of his bones has led to the breakthrough which links him to the region. 'A scientist from Manchester University has constructed a clay model of the man's head from the remains found near Charnock Richard Services on the M6, near Chorley, on July 26 last year. It is thought the victim died from "blunt force trauma" to his skull at some time between October 2000 and June 2001. Earlier investigations by experts from Glasgow University's Human Identification Unit found that the victim was likely to have been Asian, but they c

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New forensic tests are being carried out in the hope of finally closing the book on a murder in Chorley nine years ago.

A dog walker discovered human remains dumped in a pond in Charnock Richard in 2002.

Despite a lengthy police investigation, neither victim nor killer has ever been identified.

However far from closing the case the police say they’re carrying out some fresh attempts to solve it.

A Lancashire Police spokeswoman said: “Forensic work is underway in relation to them, and as we get forensic advancements we will review the evidence.

“There are no new leads at the moment, but we are still trying to identify the victim and establish who they were.”

Police will be carrying out a ‘whole range of forensic techniques’ but say they can’t go into precise details. The spokeswoman added: “We would appeal for anyone who has information to contact us.

“We are probably pinning our hopes on the forensic side of things rather than someone remembering something they saw nine years ago.”

In was on July 26, 2002, that a skeleton of a man was discovered partially submerged in a pond off Back Lane.

Police produced a computer-generated image of the face and a skull reconstruction, which showed the victim was likely to have been of Asian origin.

He was between 5ft 6ins and 5ft 8ins tall, of very slim build, and aged 20-30.

He had a deformity to his hips, probably the result of a genetic abnormality or childhood disease, while chemical tests on his bones suggested he had lived at least some of his life in the West Midlands.

Police concluded he had been killed some time between October 2000 and July 2001, and severe injuries to the back of his head suggested he had been assaulted or battered to death.

There was no trace of clothing or jewellery at the scene, no personal effects found on the body, and no vehicle abandoned nearby.

Despite appeals for information in various languages, including English, Urdu and Hindi, and two detectives travelling out to India to appeal for information in an attempt to trace the killer, Lancashire Police were unable to make any further progress on the case.

This is the second time police have hoped new technology would help them crack the baffling case, after new DNA tests were tried to identify the killer and victim in 2006.

Coun Harold Heaton, whose Chisnall ward includes Charnock Richard, said: “Obviously it was somebody’s son or husband.

“If the case could be solved I assume it would allay people’s concerns about who it was, and draw a line under it all.

“It would be intriguing to find out who it was and what happened to them, and obviously who was responsible. But until they find out who it was, they haven’t a clue.

“People go missing all over the country and it’s not explained, and sadly some end up in a ditch or a pond.”