Scout hero gives first aid after man is stabbed in Lancashire street

PARADE: David Foster, back row, third left, and below after the Remembrance Day service at St Laurence's Church in Chorley

PARADE: David Foster, back row, third left, and below after the Remembrance Day service at St Laurence's Church in Chorley

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A Cub Scout leader has been hailed as a hero after he helped save the life of a stabbing victim.

Just a short time after this picture was taken at a Remembrance Sunday parade with the 1st Clayton Brook Scouts, David Foster sprang into action when he heard a commotion outside the Spar in Tunley Holme, Clayton Brook, Bamber Bridge. Disregarding his own safety, David raced over to the scene to find a 28-year-old man critically injured and lying in a pool of blood, having been stabbed several times.

Photo Ian Robinson'Remembrance Day service at St Laurence's Church in Chorley''(David Foster is pictured on the back row third from the left (next to a woman)

Photo Ian Robinson'Remembrance Day service at St Laurence's Church in Chorley''(David Foster is pictured on the back row third from the left (next to a woman)

David said: “The Spar is right next to our Scout Hall, and me and another Scout leader were waiting in a car opposite, waiting for parents to collect their children.

“I became aware of a commotion going on, and as soon as I saw that the man was injured, I threw my bag and coat down and ran over while the children were distracted by my colleague.”

The 33-year-old customer services worker added: “The man managed to get into the shop for help and he was bleeding heavily from his wounds. I could see one on his chest and one on his arm.

“People around me in the shop were in a panic and didn’t really know what to do, but I was quite calm after having first aid training with the Scouts.

“I took my necker off and used to to keep pressure on one of his wounds, and then used another piece of clothing to compress another wound.

“I think it took about 10 minutes for the ambulance to arrive, so I was speaking to him, reassuring him the whole time and asking him questions like his name, how old he was and whether he had any other injuries.

“It’s what we are trained to do in first aid, and I was able to keep him conscious the whole time I was with him.

“I just did what anybody else would. I didn’t think about any danger I might be putting myself in, I just saw the man needed help and I knew Scouting had prepared me for that. I felt quite calm about it.”

He added: “We learn that neckers can be used as slings or as a tourniquet and now I can tell my cubs that I have been able to put that into practice.

“These skills do have a real-life impact, and you never know when you’ll need to use them.”

Simon Carter, assistant director of The Scout Association, said: “We always say Scouting changes the lives of young people well here is the proof.

“The skills and approach to life that David learned as a Scout helped him deal with a very challenging situation in way that meant he was able to save the life of another human being.

“We are very proud of David and how he helped a complete stranger in his time of need. David is an true inspiration to others.”

Clayton-le-Woods North Coun Steve Murfitt said: “Every credit to David, this has taken a lot of bravery – for all he knew, he was putting his life in danger.

“From what I know, he is a really great guy who has thrown himself into the local community, and it’s absolutely fabulous that we have Beavers, Scouts and Cubs back in Clayton Brook.

“It shows youngsters that they don’t have to follow in the direction of miscreants, they have a new sense of direction.

“There are a lot of good people in this area, and David’s actions show that.”

Police now want to speak to 32-year-old Carl Barton in connection with the offence. He has connections to a number of addresses in Clayton Brook and Bamber Bridge and his most recent links appear to be with addresses on Greenwood, Clayton Brook and Longacre at Bamber Bridge.

Members of public are advised not to approach him directly, but to contact police on 101.

Coun Murfitt added: “I would echo the police’s appeal.

“But while this is an extreme event, we must remember that it is very rare.

“Chorley Council, people at Community House, the police, Places For People have all worked very hard to improve safety and the feeling of safety in the community.

“Sadly, an event as serious as this puts fear into residents, but I must reinforce that these things are on the decline, crime figures for Clayton Brook are on the decline, and people are staying in Clayton Brook much, much longer.”