Soldier ready for action

A Chorley soldier has been taking part in an Army training exercise designed to simulate conditions in Afghanistan.'Lance Corporal Adam Berry was one of more than 260 infantrymen from the 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, also known as 1 LANCS, who took part in Exercise Spring Lion at Catterick, North Yorkshire.
A Chorley soldier has been taking part in an Army training exercise designed to simulate conditions in Afghanistan.'Lance Corporal Adam Berry was one of more than 260 infantrymen from the 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster's Regiment, also known as 1 LANCS, who took part in Exercise Spring Lion at Catterick, North Yorkshire.

A soldier from Chorley has been tackling insurgents and sweeping through woodland in temperatures of 22°C.

Lance Corporal Adam Berry was one of more than 260 infantrymen, from the 1st Battalion The Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment, who took part in a training exercise to simulate conditions in Afghanistan.

Adam, who served in Afghanistan in 2010, said: “We have been running through Afghan scenarios, the kind we would see on a tour so, if we are deployed, we all know what we’re doing. Practice makes perfect. If we go we would be interacting with local people a lot so, as an example, getting the lads used to speaking through interpreters is key.”

Exercise Spring Lion was held at Catterick, North Yorkshire. The first exercise saw soldiers sweeping through woodland and clearing it of insurgent fighters. The men had to work around a nearby civilian camp, knowing the ever-changing whereabouts of friendly troops and the constant threat of improvised explosive devices.

The second saw them enclose and assault a farm building occupied by insurgents firing weapons. Troops used the Army’s off-road patrol vehicle, the Jackal, and counter-insurgency techniques to cut off potential escape routes, giving foot patrols the best chance to get inside via a first floor window.

Adam said: “I was on the last tour so know what to expect. It will still be hard being away from family and friends but, as long as you go with the right lads, equipment and training, have good mates around and support from families at home, you feel OK about the chance of deploying.”