St Catherine’s carries out dementia scheme

St Catherine's Hospice'Nursing assistant Rachel Browne receives her certificate from Chairman of the Board of Trustees Cliff Hughes and Chair of the Patient Care Committee Trustee Lesley Anne Fraser

St Catherine's Hospice'Nursing assistant Rachel Browne receives her certificate from Chairman of the Board of Trustees Cliff Hughes and Chair of the Patient Care Committee Trustee Lesley Anne Fraser

0
Have your say

Nursing staff from St Catherine’s Hospice have completed training in dementia care as part of the organisation’s commitment to caring for people living with more than one condition.

In total 17 nurses and nursing assistants achieved the level 3 qualification in dementia care, delivered as part of the Qualifications and Credit Framework in partnership with Preston’s College.

“There are more than 100 different types of dementia which can affect people in many different ways and at different stages in their life.”

Alex Burton

Staff received their certificates from trustee Lesley Anne Fraser, chair of the patient care committee, in a ceremony at St Catherine’s Hospice ahead of this year’s Hospice Care Week, which runs from October 5 to 11.

Nursing assistant Rachel Browne added: “It was very interesting to gain an insight into the working mind of dementia.

“By investing in training like this, St Catherine’s is helping us to care for people living with this condition, and their families, in the way which is right for them and their individual circumstances.”

Alex Burton, founder of Lancashire Dementia Voices – a campaign group which runs regular drop-in meetings at The Mill community hub in the grounds of St Catherine’s Hospice – said the work St Catherine’s had been doing with dementia was very important.

Alex, aged 66 who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease when he was 62, said: “It is important to raise awareness of dementia and tackle the myth of the old lady or the old man sitting in a nursing home.

“There are more than 100 different types of dementia which can affect people in many different ways and at different stages in their life.

“The condition is more common than cancer and there is a huge issue of people living with it without it officially being diagnosed.

“As the population ages, the numbers will only rise.

“We need to raise awareness, tackle myths and get people talking about dementia so that people who are living with dementia, and caring for those affected by it, get the support they need.”

He added: “It is good to see St Catherine’s taking these steps to improve their services for hospice patients with dementia.

“We would be happy to work with them going forward to help with further training and improvements.”

The next meeting of Lancashire Dementia Voices takes place at The Mill, St Catherine’s Park, Lostock Lane, Lostock Hall, on Thursday November 26 between 3pm and 5pm.

Visit www.themillatstcatherinespark.co.uk for further details.