Tragic Chorley Pal Francis honoured by cheese choice

Tilly Carefoot, owner of Grandma Singletons Cheese, right, at the Chorley Pals statue with Andrew Edmondson, duty manager of Booths in Chorley, and Malcolm Smith, chairman of SSAFA
Tilly Carefoot, owner of Grandma Singletons Cheese, right, at the Chorley Pals statue with Andrew Edmondson, duty manager of Booths in Chorley, and Malcolm Smith, chairman of SSAFA

A Chorley Pal who was killed during the First World War has become the face of a new cheese.

An image of Francis Brindle appears on a Lancashire cheese launched by Longridge-based cheese-maker Grandma Singletons .

It marks the 100th anniversary of the start of the First World War and will raise money for military charity SSAFA, which provides support to soldiers, sailors, aircraft personnel and their families.

The Tasty Lancashire cheese is made from a recipe used by Grandma Singletons just after the end of the war.

They will donate 5p from the sale of each 200g block of cheese to SSAFA Lancashire for the next four years.

It is available at Booths and a special launch was held at the Chorley Pals memorial, on the Flat Iron car park in Chorley.

Tilly Carefoot, owner of Grandma Singletons, said: “When I was approached by SSAFA to produce a cheese to commemorate World War One, I was instantly eager to provide whatever support I could.

“My own son, Jack, is a captain in the Household Cavalry Life Guards and has seen active service in Afghanistan, so I am acutely aware of the support that both our armed forces and their families can need.”

Tilly looked back at many of the Pals in the region before choosing Francis to appear on the cheese, after finding the Chorley Pals memorial

website.

He was born in Bamber Bridge and enlisted on September 15, 1914, joining the Chorley Pals Company of the East Lancashire Regiment. He was killed in action on July 1, 1916, aged just 20.

Tilly said: “He is everybody’s boy next-door.

“He could be anybody’s brother, son, cousin. He is such a lovely young man and his uniform looks so smart.

“He represents everything that’s so tragic – he died when he was only 20, he was a Pal with his pals and his body has never been recovered. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial on the Somme, which I went to visit.

“We chose him because he is so representative of so many local lads.”