Letters and emails on February 9, 2011

The Guardian’s letters pages online

Signs need to be made clearer

Dear editor,

Twice recently, opposite Chorley Town Hall, I have nearly been involved in a collision with vehicles going straight ahead, in the inside lane, when the road is now supposed to be a single lane only.

I don’t think the car drivers are solely to blame, as the single sign which indicates that the inside lane is for traffic turning left, is partly obscured by another traffic sign in front of it.

Once at the traffic lights, there is nothing to tell drivers that they should not go ahead in both lanes.

Could the road surface not be hatched or something to indicate no road ahead for left lane traffic?

I have also seen several minor bumps, with damaged lights etc., caused by pedestrians walking out in front of vehicles onto the zebra crossing, just around the corner in St. Thomas’s Road.

The crossing may have been well intentioned but the whole system has not been well thought out. With all the CCTV cameras around, some of these incidents must have been recorded so why are they being ignored?

Graham Archer, St Michael’s Close, Chorley

Clearing the way for heroes

Dear editor,

As your UKIP MEP for Chorley, I am pleased to hear that work is taking place to clear the overgrown rhododendrons from the areas surrounding the cenotaph at Astley Park.

The cenotaph is a monument to honour those who have fallen for our freedoms and it is only right that we restore it to its full glory while cracking down on anti-social behaviour within the park.

I am confident that with the removal of the light blocking rhododendrons, Astley Park can once again be a safe place for us to all enjoy without the fear of crime.

Paul Nuttall, UK Independence Party

Praise for urology clinic

Dear editor,

I write concerning the letter from Mr Jaggs concerning his wait for his urology appointment (Guardian, February 2).

I have myself attended the urology clinic and did not find that there was a delay to the length that Mr Jaggs states.

Maybe he was unlucky I do not know, but based on the number of people he says were waiting I wonder if he was actually waiting in the correct waiting area.

When I attended the waiting area for urology was in a separate area to the normal outpatients clinic and would not have been able to hold 30 to 40 people has Mr Jaggs states.

The clinic had its own reception desk.

If Mr Jaggs was waiting in the main outpatients area, it could have been that the reason why he had to wait for such a long time was that it was only towards the end of the clinic that it was noticed that his notes were still there.

I myself have nothing but praise for the consultants and nurses in urology

Leonard Kelly, South Avenue, Chorley

Hospital needs to get sorted

Dear editor,

Further to Mr Jaggs’ letter (Guardian, February 2) I had to attend a colorectal clinic at Royal Preston Hospital on February 3.

My appointment time was for 3pm and I arrived at 2.40pm only to see on the notice board in the clinic that there was a delay of half an hour to three quarters of an hour.

After waiting for about 45 minutes a nurse informed the waiting patients that the delay had extended to an hour and apologised.

‘Ah well’, I said to myself, and resigned myself for a longer wait.

After another 45 minutes or so a nurse came and apologised again and said the delay was now one-and-a-half hours which should have meant I would be seen by the consultant around 4.30pm.

No such luck, it was 5.40pm when I was finally called to see the consultant some two hours and 40 minutes past my appointment time.

I must say, however, that the nurses were first class throughout, offering cups of tea and coffee and one even brought some packets of biscuits.

The reason for the delays a nurse told us was that appointments had been made for three patients at 2pm, three at 3pm and 15 minutes in between.

With only two doctors seeing the patients it was inevitable that the delays would occur.

Surely it is not rocket science for the appointments department to get their act together to try and minimise these delays which seem to be happening with regularity.

Trevor Hardisty, Euxton

Consultation time extended

Dear editor,

I’d just like to respond to last week’s article ‘Mum’s plea to save fields from houses’ (Guardian, February 2).

It’s great to see people like Mrs Cain coming out strongly in favour of protecting Blainscough Wood from future development because that’s what the site allocations consultation is all about – starting conversations about what areas people wouldn’t mind being developed and which areas they want protecting.

However, I just wanted to clarify the claim that no information about the consultation was available in Coppull library.

That’s not the case as all the information was there.

Unfortunately, it seems not all the staff were made aware of it and that’s something we have taken up with Lancashire County Council’s library service.

Because of the large amount of interest shown in the consultation and that some people were struggling to meet the January deadline we’ve decided to extend the period of time people have to comment by two weeks up until Monday, February 14.

Coun Peter Malpas, Chorley Council Executive Member

Carers given a caring hand

Dear editor,

The strain of caring for someone with dementia can be enormous but one Lancashire group is providing a lifeline.

Now, carers can get out and meet people once a month with the help of The Friendship Circle, run by Crossroads, Chorley & South Ribble.

While carers are at the meetings their loved ones are being cared for by Crossroads support workers.

There is no charge for this service.

Getting together with others reduces isolation, fosters friendships and reduces stress.

The group also offers various talks and days out. It gives carers chance to relax and talk things through with others in a similar situation.

The group meets at Chorley CVS Centre, Astley Park.

Anyone interested should contact Joanne or Marie on Chorley 230698.

Mrs Christine Bailey, Charnock Richard