Nostalgia: Enjoying life with The Campaigners in Leyland

Pauline Crossley in The Campaigners in the late 1970s. Pauline is stood outside her home in Slater Lane, Leyland
Pauline Crossley in The Campaigners in the late 1970s. Pauline is stood outside her home in Slater Lane, Leyland
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Being part of a Christian youth movement was a vital part of Pauline Crossley’s life when growing up.

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Pauline Crossley in The Campaigners in the late 1970s. Pauline is stood outside her home in Slater Lane, Leyland

Pauline Crossley in The Campaigners in the late 1970s. Pauline is stood outside her home in Slater Lane, Leyland

The 64-year-old from Moss Side joined The Campaigners, with St Andrew’s Church, in Leyland, when she was 10.

She loved it so much she continued through her teens and even became a chief when she was 19, leaving at the age of 24 when she got married.

She says: “I really enjoyed my time in The Campaigners.

“It was a great experience. It was a bit like Brownies and Guides, but more church 
related.

“The girls were in green uniforms and the boys wore darker colours. When I was a chief, I wore dark blue.

“We had four sections called flights and each section had six tasks to perform.

“For example we had to learn the books of the Bible, show how to clean shoes, show how to wash up. We also collected leaves and put them in a book, naming them.

“In the evenings, we would play games to get the children all together and at the end of the evening we held a Clan C, where we lined up in a semi circle, like a C and walked out. There was also camps, as groups went away to places like Wales, but I never went.

“I took a test and became one of the chiefs when I was 19.

“I loved the camaraderie of everyone. It was quite fascinating watching the children grow and see how they learn things.”

Pauline, a mother-of-two, with two grandsons, adds her aunt was also a chief.

She says: “My aunt, Sheila Crossley (now McDade) was in charge of getting some of the older children to do Duke of Edinburgh awards.”

Pauline, a former secretary, has kept in touch with some fellow Campaigners.

She adds: “One of the girls from my section saw me on Facebook and remembered me.

“It is quite flattering that she thought of me and liked learning with me.” Many of the branches in the county have disbanded, but there are still some groups in the north.