Chorley FC boss and headteacher Jamie Vermiglio hopes the football club's play-off heroics inspires his schoolchildren at Locking Stumps Community Primary School to follow their dreams

Chorley FC boss Jamie Vermiglio brought the play-off trophy to his primary school
Chorley FC boss Jamie Vermiglio brought the play-off trophy to his primary school
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Headteacher and Chorley manager Jamie Vermiglio hopes the football club's play-off promotion heroics inspires his schoolchildren to follow their dreams.

Having won promotion to the National League's top flight with a penalty shootout win against Spennymoor Town on Sunday, Vermiglio was back to his day job just over 12 hours later.

The Magpies' boss is headteacher at Warrington's Locking Stumps Community Primary School and shared the club's success with the pupils.

"It was great," Vermiglio said. "It was lovely to share it with the kids because I'm regularly talking to them about football.

"It is a nice way to inspire them.

"We have a lot of boys and girls that are very interested in football and a lot of supportive families who have actually been to watch a few of the games.

"I was drained from the day before but knowing I had the trophy on the way to school gave me a lift.

"The year sixes had their SATS week so it was a nice little boost for them.

"We had an assembly where every child in the school got to look at the trophy.

"I had a chat to them about what had happened and it was brilliant.

"Our school is brilliant.

"It is about strong relationships and all about aspirations, about being the best that you can.

"For them to see the trophy it gives them a bit of a lift.

"It contributes to our school values and school ethos.

"Every child was given the chance to lift the trophy. You had kids who were barely four lifting the trophy and kids up to the age of 11 and adults too.

"It was lovely to share and a lot of the children really wanted us to do well.

"They listened on the radio or followed on social media and it was a really proud moment for me to share it with them."

On paper, a football club and a school may not seem two organisations with a similar approach to their business.

However, Vermiglio believes his roles as manager and headteacher dovetail nicely.

The 36-year-old explained: "I'm really strong on creating a positive culture and environment.

"At school we have that with the way we speak to each other and it is a respectful environment.

"It does not matter if you are four or 11 or 34, we all have respect for each other.

"We all open doors for each other, we have good manners, we want everyone to do well.

"We speak to each other when things are not good and about how to improve.

"The same can be said about football.

"It is a real team effort; wanting to do well and a shared passion and ethos of mutual respect.

"I spoke to a few parents and they say 'every time we hear you having an interview you could be speaking about school.'

"When I'm in school they say I sound like I could be doing one of my interviews.

"There is certainly a crossover in many ways."